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View Full Version : Discuss "Lord of the Flies" (main thread)



nickb123
09-01-2008, 12:14 PM
Hey peeps, this is your main thread for LOTF discussion. Read-time starts now til Saturday 20th September, so get reading and enjoy the Lost-related discussion :)

See blog post (http://blog.lostpedia.com/2008/09/lord-of-flies-read-begins.html)

MikeyTay
09-01-2008, 01:01 PM
I read this book about 9 months ago, so I'll be trying to join in the discussion through memory.

The first point I'd like to make is how Piggy reminds me a little of Ben.
- Both wear glasses.
- Both were social outcasts as children.
- Both very clever.
- Both seem to understand what's going on more than anyone else.

blueeagleislander
09-01-2008, 01:07 PM
Perhaps Ben will have the same fate as Piggy...

Ya1smine
09-01-2008, 03:48 PM
Interesting, I see where you come from. Piggy has always striked me as kind of manipulative and bossy as well. And both of them aren't really in charge, even tho they'd badly want to be.

I've always thought Simon was the most interesting person. I'd say he's mostly like Locke. Likes wandering in the jungle on his own, not extremly social but still very helpful. And Simon, like Locke, is the only character to confront the beastie and find out the truth. Of course I don't know how close Locke is to the truth but seeminly closer than the rest of the Losties.

His death was mostly like Shannon's tho. Caused by other people being so scared that they saw the evil everywhere.

On a side note: Gatsbys American Dream (http://www.myspace.com/gatsbysamericandream) have, beside a song about LOTF called "Fable", written two called "You All Everybody" and "Station 5: The Pearl". And their drums are fantastic. :D

MikeyTay
09-01-2008, 07:17 PM
Obviously Jack can be easily linked to Ralph.

But what about LOTF's Jack? I guess you could make the link to Sawyer, being a rival to Jack's leadership techniques and a source of anarchy to the survivors.

Ya1smine
09-01-2008, 07:40 PM
Could also be linked to Locke. They're both hunters and Locke can't really deal with Jack bein the original leader, they're constantly arguing and eventually split the group into. In two. (:confused:)

Eko doesn't make a bad Simon either. Since he's got pretty much the same qualities that Locke has. And dies.

Back to piggy, as cheap as it sounds at first, he and Hurley have a lot of things in common as well. Piggy is nearly blind but really understands what's going on on the island. The boys do not realize that Piggy sees more, and he is treated poorly. Hurley sees and speaks to dead people but no one takes him seriously.

Roger = Keamy :p

Easy
09-01-2008, 07:55 PM
I read this book many, many, many years ago and don't really remember too much about it but I have always made the comparison between Hurley and Piggy espically after in season 1 when Hurley was having a chat with Jack about his diet and Hurley had to dash off into the trees with a handful of leaves.

MikeyTay
09-01-2008, 10:18 PM
I've always thought Simon was the most interesting person. I'd say he's mostly like Locke. Likes wandering in the jungle on his own, not extremly social but still very helpful. And Simon, like Locke, is the only character to confront the beastie and find out the truth. Of course I don't know how close Locke is to the truth but seeminly closer than the rest of the Losties.


Simon's secret spot in the jungle is also very alike to John's hatch in season 1.

Jacob'sWiseOldMother
09-01-2008, 11:09 PM
I finished TLOTF last month and have been waiting for the discussion to start.:)

I guess I don't see Piggy as Ben but he does have some of those qualities when he was a child. I see Ben, as an adult, more like Jack. He knows how to get people to do what he wants for him. He controls a large group and they do as he wishes. Although, Ben is no true "hunter", he still "hunts" down what he wants and gets it.

As for Piggy, I see him as Hurley and not just for the overweight issues. Piggy is usually the one to think of what everyone else should be saying. Hurley does this all the time. Hurley thinks there should be a census, as Piggy tries to keep track of the little ones.

Of course, Ralph is very similar to Jack. Everyone looks to him as a leader but both are very doubtful of their leadership skills. Ralph knows they need a fire to be rescued and Jack's main goal on Lost is the same.

I also see John as a Simon character. They both are one with their islands and have become a part of it. They feel things differently that others on the island don't. Each has a special connection to the island.

Good book!

belle42
09-03-2008, 12:30 AM
I'm going to not say much this month since the last time I read LOTF was in high school and I didn't care for it much then.
My main memory that reminded me of Lost was the 'fear of others', especially the unfounded fear of the man in the parachute.
Other Lost touchstones in LOTF: island, boar hunt, jungle-like setting, self-preservation/survival, splitting into multiple groups, weak vs strong, parachute, desire to be rescued.

schoolmann
09-03-2008, 05:10 PM
I read LOTF for the first time a couple of months ago, and immediately saw several similarities to Lost, especially the first season. The crash survivors recognize the need to organize (live together, die alone), and two leaders emerge: Ralph, who is focused on getting the group rescued (Jack), and Jack, who is focused on survival on the island and loses any interest in being rescued (Locke). Jack/Locke resents the early leadership of Ralph/Jack and focuses on hunting boar. I don't really see a Piggy character on Lost. Piggy represents rationality: if anything, Lost's Jack is a combination of Ralph and Piggy. I'll have to reread the book for Simon's character; what I recall is his hiding place and him sinking into madness. The irrational fear of the Others and the dead parachutist (a la Henry Gale, dead balloonist) are other references.

gt8595b
09-03-2008, 06:02 PM
I don't know... (by the way, huge spoilers for LotF)
EDIT: I use 'he' and 'man' just out of convenience - women can go crazy too.

I don't see much deep similarity between LotF and Lost. Yeah, there are some superficial similarities (Island, plane wreck, parachute man, two groups), but they don't mean the same. In LotF, one of the main themes was based around civilized man breaking down into chaos as soon as external constraints of order are lifted, and I just don't see this them being displayed in lost. Sure Locke doesn't want to be rescued, but that's not because he's gone savage like Jack from the book. In the book Jack isn't just someone who doesn't care about being rescued; he's left behind all the aspects that civilized man prides himself on. Jack lets Roger be his "whip" and they turn to torture and murder FOR THE PURE PLEASURE OF IT. This is the evil of chaos. I don't see this showing up either; sure there were fights and Sayid did torture Sawyer, but at the time it seemed justified, and Sayid felt so guilty that he thought he couldn't fit back into society. This is not the same. Jack (in the book) and Roger blow right past the line of sanity and civility and never look back.

Piggy is more than just thinking and good ideas - he's spurned logic and responsibility. Everyone knows Piggy's right, but nobody likes Piggy or wants to do the psychological "work" it takes to remain civilized on the island. I don't see this aspect at all in Lost. Some people compare him to Hurley or Ben. But, the important thing about Piggy, that isn't in any of the Lost characters, is the rejection of logic and responsibility.

Ralph I think represents will-power. He knew that the most important thing was keeping the smoke signal going and he tried to get everyone to do it; he's will power with out intelligence. Not until the end of the book does he realize just how valuable Piggy was. In the first few days he doesn't pay enough attention to logic and gets caught up in the passion of chaos (this is the fire and first burning of the island). This isn't like LostJack. LostJack might not know exactly the right decision, but he listened to reason and he never let himself slide into chaos. He always kept the interests of the group in mind. Some people say that LostJack might be a combination of Ralph and Piggy, but again I say that Piggy is SPURNED logic, not just logic.

Simon is an interesting character. I've heard him compared to a Christ type figure: one who brings the truth but is sacrificed instead. This is the important thing to remember about Simon - he knew the truth (about the beast/parachute man), could not tell anyone (he had a deep fear of speaking to the assembly), and was ultimately sacrificed. He did have a one-sided conversation with the pig head, but that was primal fear rising up during his delirium, and in the end he rejected it because he went to find the "beast" anyway. Simon can be looked at as one's little inner voice - on your way to chaos it's the first thing to get rid of, one's conscience. I don't really see this character represented in Lost (except for maybe the science teacher that gets the dynamite and blows up). I would say that Ben might be close to this role, only because of his sacrifice that he must leave the island, but he doesn't really represent the prime 'goodness' that Simon seems to represent.

The beast in the book is the fear of the unknown that civilization (hopefully) keeps at bay. The beast in the book was completely made up and exaggerated by the children; however, the "beast" in Lost is very real. I'm thinking of the Cerebus creature as the beast.

Over all, I see that LotF represents the disintegration of society and civilization of man as soon as he is free of it's bounds. I also think of the main characters as all parts of one person's psyche. Each character represents a different aspect of the mind, and the book is a description of one person letting go as his base side (Jack and Roger) takes over from his civilized side (Simon, Ralph, and Piggy). Either way, I don't see these themes being explored in Lost. I don't recall their being a struggle between chaos and order on the show; there maybe struggles between different types of order within the Losties, but even Locke's "native way" doesn't turn everything into mindless destruction.

Just my humble opinion, and I look forward to discussion.
mike

Jacob'sWiseOldMother
09-04-2008, 12:15 AM
I do see the "evil of chaos" on the Lost island. We have 2 groups of survivors of a plane wreck who are first secretly infiltrated and then attacked by the Others. These people called the Others are more violent with the Tailies group. The first night these Others come into the camp and kidnap people. Later on, they come again and take more people. But the thing that sets them apart is that they kill people to accomplish their mission. Ethan tries to kill Charlie and Goodwin has to kill Nathan so he doesn't reveal his cover. Goodwin was also ready to kill Anna Lucia once she discovered who he was. These Others do not follow the rules of civilization, they only do what they think is right for whatever this mission is on the island.

I relate LOTF to having an Others group (Jack and his hunters) and the survivors group (Ralph, Simon, Piggy and the little ones) One group(Others) is trying to bring in more members to its side and eventually destroy the group who is trying to get off the island (Losties).

chelsea07
09-04-2008, 02:20 AM
I actually relate the two groups in Lord of The Flies to a different set of groups (not the others and the losties). OK, so in Lord of The Flies, the kids are all in one group originally. Then they split. I think of this when Jack and Locke split into two groups in Lost. Like one group is doing what they can to leave the island (that's Jack's (LOST) group, and that would be Ralph (LOTF) group as well). Then one group is staying on the island and figuring out how to survive on it (that's Locke's (LOST) group and Jack's (LOTF) group). Get what I'm saying???

schoolmann
09-04-2008, 07:38 AM
I don't know... I don't see much deep similarity between LotF and Lost. Yeah, there are some superficial similarities (Island, plane wreck, parachute man, two groups), but they don't mean the same. In LotF, one of the main themes was based around civilized man breaking down into chaos as soon as external constraints of order are lifted, and I just don't see this them being displayed in lost. Sure Locke doesn't want to be rescued, but that's not because he's gone savage like Jack from the book. In the book Jack isn't just someone who doesn't care about being rescued; he's left behind all the aspects that civilized man prides himself on. Jack lets Roger be his "whip" and they turn to torture and murder FOR THE PURE PLEASURE OF IT. This is the evil of chaos.

Mike, I don't think that anyone is suggesting that Lost is just like LotF. Any analogy, if you press it closely enough, will break down. But I think the trajectory that Lost began on followed a similar trajectory to LotF. It seems to me that you're ignoring the development in LotF: Jack doesn't start out reveling in torture and murder; he becomes that way over time. And Locke didn't start out throwing knives into anyone holding a phone; he started out hunting boar for the good of the group (as did LotF Jack), then got obsessed with the Hatch and the Island, then started systematically sabotaging every means of communication or escape. He also thinks that living in the Barracks, like the Others have been doing, is "cheating"--he doesn't even want the technological trappings of civilization. He's gone power-mad with his group, and banishes Kate for bringing his two prisoners into contact with one another. The end result of Locke's trajectory is Rousseau (the Enlightenment philosopher's names here are not accidental); she'd killed the rest of her party and lived alone in the jungle setting traps for everyone else.

You also have to take into account that LotF was about children, who more easily throw off societal restraint than adults, and the fact that Lost had different ambitions than a relatively simple descent into madness and then rescue at the end. I don't think that makes the parallels superficial; I think LotF provided the basic foundation from which the Lost writers are telling a different, but related, story.

etshadow
09-05-2008, 01:10 PM
Like Carrie last month was more towards the story telling style of Lost, LOFT is more towards the setting and situation. I can see a lot of charater traits between the two such as those mentioned. But we are also thinking along the lines of what has already occured. Remember after the O6 left the island and John became leader terrible things happened. Maybe this is a foretelling of the group that was left behind become more savage to survive.

Et Shadow

etshadow
09-05-2008, 01:13 PM
Lord of the Flies is a loose translation of Greek for Beelzebub:eek:

96jacks
09-05-2008, 11:45 PM
Wasn't it inferred, when Simon was talking to the pigs head, that he had experienced hallucinations like that before getting to the island? Im not sure because it has been a while since i read lotf but i thought he was supposed to have been mental already

chelsea07
09-06-2008, 12:53 AM
Simon had epilepsy and was suffering from an epileptic seizure when he experienced the pig talking to him. Now, at the beginning of the book, the choir boys are all together at the meeting when the conch was blown and Simon fainted or something. (I read this book last year, so I don't recall exactly what happened). One of the boys, I think Jack said that Simon was always fainting at school and implied that it was no big deal. From this, a conclusion can be drawn that Simon suffered from epilepsy at school and was wrongly diagnosed due to lack of knowledge of the condition. So yes, Simon had epilepsy before coming to the island and suffered from seizures already.

Jacob'sWiseOldMother
09-06-2008, 03:29 AM
Lord of the Flies is a loose translation of Greek for Beelzebub:eek:

Could this very loose translation of a religious type Devil be the island of Lost? In my book, the notes in the back pages talk about this and I find it interesting that they speak of Freud's Id as another example. They mention the survival of a host and that got me thinking that maybe our Lost island is "the" host and survives by preying off those that live on the island. That to keep it "alive", it needs certain people to help it survive. I could see the black smoke monster as the force that keeps the island in the balance that it strives for.

Nick7er
09-07-2008, 05:56 PM
Here are the 2 scenarios I see in comparison to LOTF:
1. Ralph is LOST's Jack, Simon represents Locke, the strange social outcast who mysteriously knows more than the rest (especially about the beast, or LOST's smokie), and LOTF's Jack represents Ben and his group of others (the group of savages by the end of the book).
-OR-
2. LOTF's Jack is in comparison to Locke, who later becomes the leader of the Others (just like Jack becomes the leader of the savages). The savages obviously don't want rescue in LOTF, just like The Others and Locke in LOST). And obviously in both stories there is rescue at hand.

chelsea07
09-07-2008, 07:01 PM
Hey, did anyone think maybe Simon was kind of like Charlie? Or Desmond even. Because Simon kind of risks his life to help everyone else (by finding out about the parachutist and trying to tell everyone, he dies). I dunno, I always thought of Simon kind of a "Jesus" figure, he dies to help everyone else. So anyone who sacrificed themselves to help others in LOST, is like Simon, right?

Jacob'sWiseOldMother
09-07-2008, 10:24 PM
Charlie did risk his life to help get people rescued and off the island but I guess I didn't think of him being a "Jesus" type figure. He wasn't really reborn or anything but he did get his redemption story. Now to me Desmond is more like a "Jesus" type figure. He is told that he must push that button or every man, woman and child will die if he doesn't. The scene of him in the jungle after the Swan implosion reminds me of a sort of rebirth scene. Desmond wakes up completely nude and somehow miraculously alive.

I guess I think of Simon as being more like John and one with their islands. Simon knew the truth about the "monster" and tried to tell the children but he was murdered instead. I think John also somewhat understands the "monster" and knows why the island is so special. He doesn't have all the answers because Lost is more complicated than LotF is. Simon was a shy, little boy who had courage to face this unseen monster and his discovery was lost to the other children because of their lack of civilized communication.

lostrulz
09-08-2008, 12:50 AM
I have never posted in this forum b4 and missed out on the reading of Carrie for the book club but did manage to secure a copy of LOTF in hopes of contriubting to your discussion.
I felt while reading that the LOTF character Ralph was parallel with Jack on LOST. Both were characters that had the moniker of "leader" thrust upon them and became reluctant leaders in the quest of rescue from the island. Both characters also fought off becoming cynical and instead seemed to turn negatives into positives.
In the beginning, I had to compare LOTF's Jack with Locke for the hunting factor and apparent no desire to leave the island. After Jack's obvious lust for power, I had to equate him to Ben. So that left me torn btwn Locke/Ben for Jack.
It was easy for me to see Piggy in Hurley. The need for lists, the butt of jokes, trying so hard to fit in with the other "groups" only to be turned back from hunting, mapping the island, etc with the excuse that he'd be dead weight...he was needed elsewhere.
I had to chuckle with the introduction of Sam & Eric and couldn't get Steve & Scott out of mind.
Simon I compared to Charlie because they both saw things with fresh eyes and could bring a new light to most situations surrounding them, but because of their checkered pasts (Simon's "episodes"/Charlie's addiction) neither character was taken seriously.
The beast and the terror it inflicted on the group reminded me of Smokey
Roger could be compared to either Michael (does what he needs to do just to get by) or Keamy (soldier first and foremost)
I must say it was a most interesting read. I hadn't read this book since the 8th grade which was mmpph years ago and sitting down and reading it with a LOST mind set was quite intriquing. I'm really looking forward to reading other peoples takes on the book in the next few weeks and hope to get my copy of Slaughterhouse Five in time for next months read.

blueeagleislander
09-08-2008, 08:50 AM
Hey, did anyone think maybe Simon was kind of like Charlie? Or Desmond even. Because Simon kind of risks his life to help everyone else (by finding out about the parachutist and trying to tell everyone, he dies). I dunno, I always thought of Simon kind of a "Jesus" figure, he dies to help everyone else. So anyone who sacrificed themselves to help others in LOST, is like Simon, right?

Well, Boone. Sacrificed himself to try and get the message out about the survivors.

chelsea07
09-08-2008, 08:03 PM
Yeah, I never even thought of Boone. That makes sense. Also, still going along the lines of Charlie, his last message was that it wasn't Penny's boat. He was trying to tell everyone that they were wrong. Kind of like Simon's last message was it's not a monster.

Jacob'sWiseOldMother
09-08-2008, 11:51 PM
I have never posted in this forum b4 and missed out on the reading of Carrie for the book club but did manage to secure a copy of LOTF in hopes of contriubting to your discussion.
I felt while reading that the LOTF character Ralph was parallel with Jack on LOST. Both were characters that had the moniker of "leader" thrust upon them and became reluctant leaders in the quest of rescue from the island. Both characters also fought off becoming cynical and instead seemed to turn negatives into positives.
In the beginning, I had to compare LOTF's Jack with Locke for the hunting factor and apparent no desire to leave the island. After Jack's obvious lust for power, I had to equate him to Ben. So that left me torn btwn Locke/Ben for Jack.
It was easy for me to see Piggy in Hurley. The need for lists, the butt of jokes, trying so hard to fit in with the other "groups" only to be turned back from hunting, mapping the island, etc with the excuse that he'd be dead weight...he was needed elsewhere.
I had to chuckle with the introduction of Sam & Eric and couldn't get Steve & Scott out of mind.
Simon I compared to Charlie because they both saw things with fresh eyes and could bring a new light to most situations surrounding them, but because of their checkered pasts (Simon's "episodes"/Charlie's addiction) neither character was taken seriously.
The beast and the terror it inflicted on the group reminded me of Smokey
Roger could be compared to either Michael (does what he needs to do just to get by) or Keamy (soldier first and foremost)
I must say it was a most interesting read. I hadn't read this book since the 8th grade which was mmpph years ago and sitting down and reading it with a LOST mind set was quite intriquing. I'm really looking forward to reading other peoples takes on the book in the next few weeks and hope to get my copy of Slaughterhouse Five in time for next months read.

I like some of your comparsions! I never thought to associate Sam and Eric with Scott and Steve. They are similar as they are both background workers who never get credit for what they do. And no one can tell them apart because no one really cares!

I also like the Charlie and Simon comparison. Simon has more of a connection to the island than I think Charlie did and that is why I thought he was a bit like John. I think of Simon as being more shy and reserved than Charlie.

I agree with LotF Jack being a combination of both John and Ben but I think he became more like Ben as the story continued. Jack got the boys to do what he wanted and that's when I thought of Ben.

As for Roger I was creeped out by his character. The way he watched the little boys as they played was weird. I think he was the most disturbed boy on the island. The fall to becoming wild with no rules was very easy for him. He could kill easily with no regrets in his mind. Sounds like Keamy to me!

blueeagleislander
09-11-2008, 01:39 PM
I'm surprised no one's made the Piggy-Hurley comparison.

Same physical appearance, and especially early on behave the same way. Eager to help, but sort of excluded by the leaders. Oh, and the census. Could think of more but I'm tired.

Jacob'sWiseOldMother
09-11-2008, 10:39 PM
I'm surprised no one's made the Piggy-Hurley comparison.

Same physical appearance, and especially early on behave the same way. Eager to help, but sort of excluded by the leaders. Oh, and the census. Could think of more but I'm tired.

Oh, we did but that was back on page 1! I always thought that Piggy was the voice of reason and civilization on the island. I think Hurley is the same way on Lost. He says what all of us at home are thinking. Piggy was there to help Ralph out and I think that Hurley does that for a lot of people on Lost. Hurley is kind of the island morale booster! Golf anyone?:D

booradley
09-13-2008, 03:00 AM
I forgot how depressing this book was. I feel so sorry for ol' Pigmeister with his specs and his ass-mar and his "I've got the conch". Poor li'l Pig. :(

exposedphilm
09-14-2008, 05:00 AM
I'm reading the book right now past halfway. I came across a part that made me think why some of these books are in the show or referenced and I wanted to see what everyone thinks about it. It's in chapter 5 when they are discussing the beast. They are arguing whether they are real and existing on the island or at all. I think Piggy is the one who says it though... about how if only adults could see them now, acting they way they are on the island. How they should behave and act accordingly or properly.

Well, with that in mind and thinking about how I would think if I read that book and wanted to just be ironic, wouldn't putting a bunch of grown ups on an island with a monster and weird things that would scare the living piss out of anyone be showing kids how grownups would act if they were on an island? I don't know if I made sense there or not... but I think you get the idea.

I like to think how the writers are thinking about the influences and references for the show and wonder if that's really what they are doing... just playing with the audience. Showing them a counter to some of pop cultures most influential messages of our time. I do see the resemblances to characters and such but I think the writers are smarter than that.

blueeagleislander
09-14-2008, 08:01 AM
Lol, after reading the first few posts, I noticed Piggy-Hurley got mentioned a bazillion times.

Jacob'sWiseOldMother
09-14-2008, 09:01 PM
In both LotF and Lost, children and adults are put in situations far from the world of civilization. They are stranded on islands that have no rules ready made for them. They each have to try to make their own rules and live by them. But each of these stories has breakdowns in the rules and civilized behavior is lost. Both of the stories are confronted with the fear of the unknown. Children of LotF have much more vivid imaginations than adults and their fear is fed by that. Adults of Lost have the fear but are more likely to dimiss the fear and get on with other things as we see on Lost. The same questions are part of both of these stories. What is real and what is imaginary.

In chapter 5 Piggy says "life is scientific, that's what it is." He doesn't give in to the fears and tries to explain the beast that way. But later on Ralph asks Piggy if there are ghosts or beasts. Piggy tells him that there isn't any such thing because then things wouldn't make sense in the world. But Ralph comes back with a chilling response that sounds a lot like our island Lost. He says "But suppose they don't make sense? Not here, on this island? Supposing things are watching us and waiting?":eek:

Sawyerissexy
09-15-2008, 04:18 PM
Ralph = Jack (duh), I thought Jack as a Locke type, couldn't place Simon, and Piggy's a definate Hurley. Love the whole fear of monster thing. Pretty much everything origional I've thought of has been mentioned! Darn! But great read.

Kristallregen
09-20-2008, 03:15 AM
The last 20 Pages were so thrilled... i cant stopped reading at this point. it was amazing, and lots of ideas that i seen back in LOST (plan crash, Island, 2 Groups, etc)

Foz
09-20-2008, 08:45 AM
So I just finished Lord of the Flies, after missing out on Carrie month and just catching it up!, and I have to say, both the novels have been an interesting read and an invited exploration into the origins and world of LOST.
Lord of the Flies had a cruel irony to it, of survival, being human and growing up, themes reflected in LOST.

Loved the character of Piggy and found the whole animosity, conflict and disagreements between the two leader figures in the novel, protagonist Ralph and antagonist Roger, so thrilling. As the two boys are their own powerful personalities fighting for rightful leadership, through different means.

Referencing Locke, Jack and Ben in their different methods of leadership and the lengths they go to retain their power.

Didn't love the disinterested writing style, as a naraation is served its purpose, otherewise Carrie was a better read for me, yet Lord of the Flies a better and more LOST orientated read.

Otherwise found the whole book LOST ish and am beginning to grow suspicious of the producers! Nah, the literary, character, thematic and plot influences off LOST are heavily present in Lord of the Flies, a great read for the book club.:o

nickb123
09-21-2008, 12:08 PM
Hi guys, sorry I haven't been around much this month. I'm unsticking this thread now as the read-time has ended. Feel free to continue discussion however as long as you wish!

Next week its Slaughterhouse-Five time!

peterjames
09-24-2008, 09:20 AM
im hating this book, and i still cant finish it ughh
just got up to the last chapter.

but im like every1 else ralph= jack.
and piggy is like hurley

and the whole stranded on an island and survival links obviously lol

blueeagleislander
09-24-2008, 10:08 AM
Finished it last night. I love the last few chapters when everything goes into meowdness.

lostaddict12
09-25-2008, 01:52 AM
I read LotF last winter for English class and made Lost connections even then :o the teacher is a Lost fan too so it was actually mentioned in class a couple times :p

Piggy being like Hurley - always left behind/excluded :(
obvious stuff everyone's already said like Ralph-Jack, Jack-Locke and Simon-Locke, and obviously the monster.

and I must say, <3 Simon!!!! :D

Domino
09-29-2008, 12:26 AM
Love the book, sounds silly but iv'e only read bits of it.

Also, Couldnt find a thread for the LOTF connection "The Coral island" by Robert Ballantyne, interesting too though.