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shhrz
12-26-2008, 09:59 PM
Hi
first time posting on this forum, so please bear with me.

A while ago, I read on a fansite that there is a book called "The Island" which is written by some doctor who went to India and lived there for a long time. This book is slightly related to the series.

I have been searching all sites regarding this book but cannot find anything on it. I was wondering, I'm sure some of you guys(at least the ones who can make sense of this post) know what this book is and what's the author's name.

Any help would be much appreciated.

thanks in advance,
...

tony47ch
12-27-2008, 04:04 AM
nice to meet you all.

Gilliganista!
12-27-2008, 02:13 PM
Hi
...
A while ago, I read on a fansite that there is a book called "The Island" which is written by some doctor who went to India and lived there for a long time. This book is slightly related to the series.

I have been searching all sites regarding this book but cannot find anything on it. I was wondering, I'm sure some of you guys(at least the ones who can make sense of this post) know what this book is and what's the author's name.

Any help would be much appreciated.

thanks in advance,
...

I just searched for awhile at books.google.com, and did not find anything there, but truthfully, with 148,500 to check out, I didn't get far!

Since you don't know author or publisher, can you name the website where you saw this? maybe that would help.

G

Trace
12-27-2008, 07:38 PM
Is it possible your thinking of "The Island" by Aldous Huxley?

Gilliganista!
12-27-2008, 09:40 PM
Is it possible your thinking of "The Island" by Aldous Huxley?

Trace may be on to something there:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Island_(novel)


It is the account of Will Farnaby, a cynical journalist who is shipwrecked on the fictional island of Pala. Island is Huxley's utopian counterpart to his most famous work, the 1932 novel Brave New World, itself often paired with George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Does that sound familiar? Pala, would of course, remind us of Pala Ferry on LOST.

For more on Huxley (with a reminder that entries on wikipedia may have inaccuracies):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldous_Huxley

Oh, and where are my manners? Welcome, shhrz and tony47ch and Trace!

Gilli

shhrz
12-27-2008, 10:48 PM
Thank you all for your assistance.

But unfortunately, I dont think that is the book.

As far as the site that i saw it on, i have checked pretty much every fansite, but it seems it's just disappeared.

oh well. so much for trying the whole "reading" thing.

Desiree
01-15-2009, 01:39 AM
The book on the official book club list is "The Island" by Aldous Huxley. I tracked down a copy and bought it a month or so ago. I haven't gotten around to reading it yet (Only because I have 80 billion books to read...) but I'm excited to discuss it when I do get around to it.

Agent Graves
02-01-2009, 05:43 AM
I bought it and I have read about 2 chapters, I can say that so far it seems like a broken mirror image of the show - so I've stopped reading - for now.

quebec62
02-09-2009, 05:05 AM
what do you mean by slightly related to the series? Is it picked-up some part of the book? Is is has story about time machine? or is it just happened to has similar story with the series? I mean it is an old published book, year of 1962. Could it be in that year there was already discussion about time machine.

hernameisrenee
02-13-2009, 03:55 PM
I just started reading 'Island' and the idea is that a journalist shipwrecks on a mysterious island that has been run by a perfect utopian society for a couple hundred years. It delves into all sorts of philosophies of pleasure, fear, family structure and happiness...so far, very good book; but honestly, not too much in line with lost

MommaB
02-15-2009, 04:59 PM
I was reading the wikipedia entry for the author - Huxley and there were some strange parellels I picked up on :

I am pasting and copying direct from wikipedia:

***Huxley became a close friend of Remsen Bird, president of Occidental College. He spent much time at the college, which is in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of Los Angeles. The college appears as "Tarzana College" in his satirical novel After Many a Summer Dies the Swan (1939). The novel won Huxley that year's James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction. Huxley also incorporated Bird into the novel.***

***In 1956 he married Laura Archera (1911-2007), also an author. She wrote This Timeless Moment, a biography of Huxley........On his deathbed, unable to speak, Huxley made a written request to his wife for "LSD, 100 g, intramuscular". According to her account of his death, in This Timeless Moment, she obliged with an injection at 11:45 am and another a couple of hours later. He died at 5:21 pm on 22 November 1963, aged 69. Media coverage of his death was overshadowed by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, on the same day, as was the death of the Irish author C. S. Lewis.***

***Brave New World (along with Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Yevgeni Zamyatin's We) helped form the anti-utopian or dystopian tradition in literature and has become synonymous with a future world in which the human spirit is subject to conditioning and control.***

***On psychological totalitarianism [13] (1959): "And it seems to me perfectly in the cards that there will be within the next generation or so a pharmacological method of making people love their servitude, and producing ... a kind of painless concentration camp for entire societies, so that people will in fact have their liberties taken away from them but will rather enjoy it, because they will be distracted from any desire to rebel by propaganda, brainwashing, or brainwashing enhanced by pharmacological methods."***

***On social organizations: "One of the many reasons for the bewildering and tragic character of human existence is the fact that social organization is at once necessary and fatal. Men are forever creating such organizations for their own convenience and forever finding themselves the victims of their home-made monsters."***


Just found it ironic. But I might be stretching. LOL!

redsox032202
04-02-2009, 05:51 PM
that is the right book, I am reading it now, it is almost identicle to LOST as far as I can tell. I know I am probably reading too much into it, but I am enjoying the book either way