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Thread: more about Book of Laws

  1. #1
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    Default more about Book of Laws

    I've never been a religious person but have always been fascinated by them. So I did a little reading about the Book of Laws and found it very interesting.

    Now the Book of Laws or Kitab-i-Aqbas is the most important text to the Baha'i faith, which a few people have pointed out. You can read a synopsis of it here: http://reference.bahai.org/en/t/b/KA/ka-17.html

    What I find more interesting is the religion itself, which I knew little about. Here are a few notes from religionfacts.com (quotes from that site as well):

    -Every religion is equally important because each was founded by a messenger from the same God. "Progressive Revelation" basically means that God has slowly over time made himself known in different ways to different people in whatever ways were appropriate for that time - thus, different religions were formed.

    -There was no original sin and Satan does not exist. People who become evil have done so of their own free will.

    -Humanity will never understand God. We only know little pieces from what God's manifestations have told us (Jesus, Buddha, etc.).

    -The worst "sin" (though they don't use that term) is PRIDE. "The prideful person feels in absolute control of his life and the circumstances surrounding it and he seeks power and dominance over others because such power helps him maintain this illusion of superiority."

    -About the afterlife:
    "Thus Bahá'ís do not regard heaven and hell as literal places but as different states of being during one's spiritual journey toward or away from God.

    Bahá'ís understand the spiritual world to be a timeless and placeless extension of our own universe--and not some physically remote or removed place.

    But beyond this, the exact nature of the afterlife remains a mystery. Bahá'u'lláh wrote, "The nature of the soul after death can never be described." "


    In general, the religion focuses on world peace and teaches that all of humanity's problems are due to spiritual problems. Every so often, a new manifestation of God is chosen to deliver more information to us. They also believe that science and religion are harmonious.

    Now I'm assuming that the book placed in front of little Locke by Richard is indeed the same Book of Laws, the most holy book of this faith, and I don't think that it was put there on accident.

    Interesting to me. Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    First time poster so be gentle.....

    When Mr Eko gave Locke the orientation film that was in the bible, he told the story about the book of Laws, which was the Old Testament. I'm not sure what this means, but I keep thinking about that scene.

  3. #3

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    [Locke walks toward the kitchen and finds Eko sitting at the table.]

    LOCKE: Hello again.

    EKO: Hello. I have something I think you should see. If you don't mind, I will begin at the beginning. Long before Christ the king of Judah was a man named Josiah.

    LOCKE: Boy when you say beginning, you mean beginning.

    EKO: At that time the temple where the people worshipped was in ruin. And so the people worshipped idols, false gods. And so the kingdom was in disarray. Josiah, since he was a good king, sent his secretary to the treasury and said: "We must rebuild the temple. Give all of the gold to the workers so that this will be done." But when the secretary returned, he had no gold. And when Josiah asked why this was the secretary replied, "We found a book." Do you know this story?

    LOCKE: No, I'm afraid I don't.

    EKO: What the secretary had found was an ancient book -- the Book of Law. You may know it as the Old Testament. And it was with that ancient book, not with the gold, that Josiah rebuilt the temple. On the other side of the island we found a place much like this, and in this place we found a book. [Eko unwraps the book and pushes it toward Locke] I believe what's inside there will be of great value to you.

    [Locke opens the book. A square has been cut out, and inside is a piece of film.]
    4 8 15 16 23 42 EXECUTE 108

    Lostpedia User Page: Phoénix

    ...

  4. #4

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    Book of Law = Old Testament, I guess

    Book of Laws = book for this other religion
    4 8 15 16 23 42 EXECUTE 108

    Lostpedia User Page: Phoénix

    ...

  5. #5
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    also w/in the old testament Leviticus is the book of the Law, the old testament itself isn't usually described that way.

    I want to look more into Baha'i.
    ...or, on second thought, go ahead and keep making stuff up.

  6. #6
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    Doc Jensen had a good tidbit on the Book of Laws in his column Friday:

    But the Book of Law reference is worth focusing on for a few sentences, because it strikes me as proof positive that the writers of Lost not only are keenly aware of how its cultists scrutinize their work but mischievously play to this crowd too. After all, Book of Law evokes a bona fide cult text — or should I say occult text? It's called The Book of the Law, written in 1904 by ''the wickedest man on the planet,'' Aleister Crowley. The book extols the philosophy of Thelema, which is summed up thusly: ''Do what thou wilt.'' Or, in the words of Lost-cited Mama Cass, ''Make your own kind of music/Make your own special song.'' Or, as 16-year-old John Locke raged in the character's third flashback scene, ''Don't tell me what I can't do!'' This came after a bunch of bullies locked Locke in a locker — continuing a recurring theme of a boxed-in confinement throughout the episode — and a kindly teacher encouraged John to attend a summer science camp run by Mittelos, which we know is the off-Island outfit run by the Others. But the brainy Locke refused. He didn't want to be a man of science — he wanted to be a boy of action. Play sports. Go on adventures. Play with knives and hunt some boar, presumably. His teacher responded, ''You can't be the prom king. You can't be the quarterback. You can't be a superhero.''

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    Right, but Crowley's book was called The Book of the Law and Eko refers to the Book of Law ... neither were the Book of Laws, which was written by Bahá'u'lláh, the last chosen manifestation of God, in 1873.

    My theory is that as John becomes the chosen King of the Island, he will want to become a strong but peaceful leader who is responsible for uniting everyone, and will look to the Bahá'í faith for guidance. It explains why Ben failed (he was too proud of himself, felt he was superior to others, and believed he had control over his life and others). John is a guy who I think truly accepts all others and has a firm belief in an unexplainable island, much like the Bahá'ís believe that all religions are connected and essentially true, and they are fundamentally rooted in total faith in and acceptance of the unexplainable.

    John may someday own a copy of this text so that, yes, it does/will belong to him.

  8. #8
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    Great post Teacher! Welcome to LP forums. I do think this Book of Laws will be important as the show finishes up in the next 2 seasons. TPTB said that the Bible is important to the show so religion is playing a part in the show.

    I like the idea that Ben has had to much "pride" in himself and now a new person must take his place. Ben has become very powerful and he uses that power to run his agendas. John told Ben at his house that he was cheating by living in houses and having all the comforts of living. It will be interesting to see how Locke takes over the control of leadership and what he will do with it.

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    Welcome Teach

    I did some digging into The Book of Laws back after the episode first aired too. I agree that it's something important, sometimes I think it's the most overlooked clue on the whole show. When you try to fit what we know about either the DI or the Hostiles into the B'ahai faith, both seem to have striking similarities.
    "Either you die a hero, or live long enough to see yourself become the villain"

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  10. #10
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    Yeah I always thought The Book would have a big part in the lore also.I see all your guy's tie-in's and they are delicious food for thought.

    Although for whatever reason the book of laws talk is makin me miss Eko.He was my fav when he was around.


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