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Thread: Discuss "Alice in Wonderland" (main thread)

  1. #1

    Default Discuss "Alice in Wonderland" (main thread)

    Here's the place to discuss this month's book, which incorporates "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There."

    For details on where you can get the book from, including how to view it online for free and fully legally, see the blog here.
    "And we're live in 4...8...15...16..."

  2. #2

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    Sorry to start this forum on a bad note, but I HATED this book. Given all the great books available for us to read, I am disappointed in this choice, especially considering LLL may be ending.
    I have loved being involved in the LLL and would love to see it continue even when Lost Season 5 begins. There should be some new books to add the to list next year.
    Please everyone, keep the LLL going in 2009

  3. #3
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    markno, why did you hate it?
    Quote Originally Posted by myllian View Post
    I think 'perdidos' means 'lost' in Spanish, so perdiphile = lost lover. (I'm just guessing)

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by blueeagleislander View Post
    markno, why did you hate it?
    I found it annoying, no real plot or character development. No sense to the story, not funny. Just a silly read.
    I remember reading it as a child and hating it then, now I've read it as an adult and I still hate it.
    So sorry to be so negative

  5. #5

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    Hey all,
    first time in the book club threads. Personally, I love Alice in Wonderland. It's always been one of my favorite books and I love the influence it has on Lost.

    In response to markno's take, I can completely appreciate someone finding this book annoying, etc. But I don't think it's meant to have the plot and character development that we're used to finding in other books that we read. It seems that the inhabitants of Wonderland can make perfect sense out of the world they're living in, which we find all the more infuriating because it is so ridiculous to us. But imagine one of them experiencing life in our world. Would it not be just as frustrating and absurd to them to see the way we live?
    Look at the lessons that Alice is forced to study and learn day in and day out. Ridiculous, nonsensical, and entirely pointless. But that's just the way things are in the world so we accept it as making sense and having a purpose. Anything can make sense, but everything is nonsense.

    Anyway, hope that sparks some discussion...

  6. #6

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    in my book (german version) there is a discussion at the end. It tells that what the book make so special is that the author was fallen in love with a girl that name was alice. and that all this stuff in the story are the feelings to this girl. i think this makes this book so special.

  7. #7

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    I started early and am already halfway through "Looking Glass".

    The second book is much more interesting, but I have yet to find any references to the show.

    The only one that I can think of so far is that the chess problem presented in the second book may have something to do with the season three ep "Enter 77" where Locke beats the chess computer.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristallregen View Post
    in my book (german version) there is a discussion at the end. It tells that what the book make so special is that the author was fallen in love with a girl that name was alice. and that all this stuff in the story are the feelings to this girl. i think this makes this book so special.
    Her name was Alice Liddell. Carroll's relationship with her was purely platonic and there is no evidence to suggest otherwise.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hieroanonymous View Post
    I started early and am already halfway through "Looking Glass".

    The second book is much more interesting, but I have yet to find any references to the show.

    The only one that I can think of so far is that the chess problem presented in the second book may have something to do with the season three ep "Enter 77" where Locke beats the chess computer.
    I think the show uses Alice as more of a reference thematically. For example The Looking Glass station was half way through the whole show at the end of season three. So on one side of the looking glass, you have The Island, i.e. Wonderland, a fantastical world to which all these characters all seem to have followed a white rabbit (Jack's father, Locke's Walkabout, Sawyer's Sawyer, Hurley's curse, etc). On the other side (and we have yet to see this completely, since there's two seasons left) is the real world, (LA for the most part) where the characters feel numb to the trivial reality they're used to living in.

    There are various direct references to the book, like The Looking Glass and the white rabbit, but by and large they're pretty abstract. We don't see Locke talking to a giant Caterpillar, but he does get similar advice from Ben, doesn't he?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by esbanks303 View Post
    The Looking Glass station was half way through the whole show at the end of season three. So on one side of the looking glass, you have The Island, i.e. Wonderland. On the other side (and we have yet to see this completely, since there's two seasons left) is the real world,
    ...I would doubt that the writers actually had this in mind but I do like the idea.

    I've just finished Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and I have to say I didn't really enjoy it either. I think it's a nonsensical children's book really and I can see little direct relation to Lost.

    However, I can understand that it might be an indirect influence to the themes of lost. The island can be very wonderland-esque with plot points like the monster, the polar bear, the French woman and the hatch etc.

    Also the pace of Lost, particuarly in season 1, can be similar to that of the book. Every episode a new story line is created or a new character introduced without stopping to explain or build on the previous one. In the same way, each chapter of AAIW describes a new scene or new character before quickly moving onto the next.
    Last edited by MikeyTay; 11-07-2008 at 09:00 PM.

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